Yes, the SEC Wants Real Estate Fund Managers to Register

Earlier I had pointed out how a real estate fund manager could be considered an investment adviser and have to register with the SEC under the Investment Advisers Act.

In the Proposed Changes to Form ADV published on November 19, the SEC has made it clear that real estate funds are part of the mix.  They have proposed  revisions to Form ADV that better deal with more private funds being covered by the Investment Advisers Act.

In the proposed new Schedule D to Form ADV, the SEC requires you to designate the type of fund.  If you are still wondering if a real estate fund might need to register, look through the list of fund types:

Question 10: Type of Private Fund: For purposes of this question the following definitions apply:

“Hedge fund” means any private fund that:

a. Has a performance fee or allocation calculated by taking into account unrealized gains;
b. May borrow an amount in excess of one-half of its net asset value (including any committed capital) or may have gross notional exposure in excess of twice its net asset value (including any committed capital); or
c. May sell securities or other assets short.

A commodity pool is categorized as a hedge fund solely for purposes of this question. For purposes of this definition, do not net long and short positions. Include any borrowings or notional exposure of another person that are guaranteed by the private fund or that the private fund may otherwise be obligated to satisfy.

“Liquidity fund” means any private fund that seeks to generate income by investing in a portfolio of short term obligations in order to maintain a stable net asset value per unit or minimize principal volatility for investors.

“Private equity fund” means any private fund that is not a hedge fund, liquidity fund, real estate fund, securitized asset fund, or venture capital fund and does not provide investors with redemption rights in the ordinary course.

Real estate fund” means any private fund that is not a hedge fund, that does not provide investors with redemption rights in the ordinary course and that invests primarily in real estate and real estate related assets.

“Securitized asset fund” means any private fund that is not a hedge fund and that issues asset backed securities and whose investors are primarily debt-holders.

“Venture capital fund” means any private fund meeting the definition of venture capital fund in rule 203(l)-1 under the Advisers Act.

“Other private fund” means any private fund that is not a hedge fund, liquidity fund, private equity fund, real estate fund, securitized asset fund, or venture capital fund.

“Real estate fund” made the list. I take that as a clear sign that the SEC wants real estate fund managers to register under the Investment Advisers Act.

Sources:

Image of the Empire State Building is by Christian Mehlführer

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3 Responses to Yes, the SEC Wants Real Estate Fund Managers to Register

  1. Kara O'Brien December 6, 2010 at 4:09 pm #

    LOTS of changes coming with this proposal. We just posted a great memo from Sullivan & Cromwell on all of the proposed changes on the Securities Law Practice Center if anyone is interested. http://bit.ly/etbATd

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